HomeNews / DocumentsMalaysia's StatementsMalaysia's Statements 201516 DECEMBER 2015 - STATEMENT BY H.E. MR. RAMLAN IBRAHIM, PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF MALAYSIA TO THE UNITED NATIONS, SECURITY COUNCIL BRIEFING ON “TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS IN SITUATIONS OF CONFLICT: ISIL AND BEYOND”

16 DECEMBER 2015 - STATEMENT BY H.E. MR. RAMLAN IBRAHIM, PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF MALAYSIA TO THE UNITED NATIONS, SECURITY COUNCIL BRIEFING ON “TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS IN SITUATIONS OF CONFLICT: ISIL AND BEYOND”

Thank you Madam President,

 

I join earlier speakers in expressing appreciation to you Madam President, and to the US delegation for convening this meeting which my delegation supports.


2. The initiative is timely and appropriate in seeking to shine a light on the heinous practice of human trafficking increasingly perpetrated by violent extremist groups such as Da’esh, Boko Haram and the Lord’s Resistance Army, among others.

 

3. The fact that such deplorable acts occur increasingly frequently in the context of conflict situations constitute a clear and present threat to international peace and security.

 

4. As such, it merits closer scrutiny and concerted action not only by this Council, but also by the UN system and more generally, by the international community.

 

5. In this connection, I thank the briefers namely Deputy SG Mr. Jan Eliasson, UNODC Executive Director Mr. Yury Fedotov, Freedom Fund CEO Mr. Nick Grono, and Ms. Nadia Murad Basee Taha for their invaluable insights and perspectives which have greatly enriched this discussion.

 

6. For Ms. Taha, I have listened most intently to your presentation and am humbled by your grace, courage and perseverance in facing such adversity.

 

7. My delegation and I have been deeply moved by your experiences and suffering, which I am sure also holds true for other victims. We greatly appreciate your presence here today.

 

Madam President,

 

8. Malaysia reiterates its fullest condemnation of all acts of intolerance, intimidation and violence in situations armed conflict perpetrated by terrorists/violent extremist groups, particularly acts of human trafficking where victims are subjected to slavery, torture and even murder.

 

9. We reject unequivocally any linkage which groups such as Da’esh and Boko Haram seek to establish between such heinous practices with precepts of Islam, which is a religion founded on peace and the dignity of the human person whether woman, man or child. On that note, Malaysia is pleased to join the Council’s consensus and welcomes the adoption of S/PRST/2015/25.

 

10. We believe that the PRST represents a concrete first step by Council in recognising the international peace and security dimension of human trafficking while at the same time, underscoring the need to take coordinated, sustained and decisive action against perpetrators. It also sits well with Council’s ongoing efforts to better coordinate implementation of its own policies and decisions in the fight against terrorism and violent extremism.

 

11. While emphasising the centrality and importance of respect and adherence to precepts of international human rights and humanitarian laws in this regard, another equally key component is the better integration or coordinaton of efforts undertaken under the framework of international criminal law, specifically UNTOC and its Palermo Protocol.

 

Madam President,

 

12. In responding to the call in the concept note for concrete, action-oriented discussion, I wish to share the following 3 proposals:

 

12.1. With a view to addressing the scourge of human trafficking in a comprehensive and wholistic manner, we stress the importance of putting in place reintegration or re-insertion activities/programmes, especially for ‘liberated’ women and children not only to protect them from re-victimization and stigmatisation but also to enable them to believe that there is hope after victimhood;

 

12.2. While mindful of the context of conflict in which the kind of human trafficking currently being discussed occurs, we would stress the importance of States subscribing to and implementing instruments such as the Palermo Protocol which include provisions on measures for physical, psychological and social recovery of victims of human trafficking; and

 

12.3. Improving coordination with existing initiatives, for example mainstreaming the outcomes envisioned in the PRST in the work of the Council’s Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict which by virtue of resolution 2225 is also paying greater attention to the issue of abduction and kidnapping of children in conflict situations. Further linkages could be made with the work of the 1267/1989 Committee and other relevant sanctions committees.

 

Madam President,

 

13. To conclude, Malaysia believes that TIP poses a real threat to many countries. Indeed, due to its location and relative political and economic stability, Malaysia has had to contend with the issue of human trafficking for quite some time now.

 

14. It is a multifaceted problem which requires extensive coordination and cooperation from all sides including governments, multilateral partners, civil society and other relevant interlocutors.

 

15. Given the complexity and cross-cutting nature of human trafficking and related issues, political will at the national, regional and international levels is a major factor in determining whether tangible and sustained results or improvements could be achieved.

 

16. In this regard, the Council is well placed to continue making strong, unified pronouncements; backed up by equally effective policy decisions and measures in unequivocally demanding for accountability and for denying impunity on the part of perpetrators.

 

I thank you, Madam President.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Malaysia
Wisma Putra
No. 1, Jalan Wisma Putra, Precinct 2
62602 Putrajaya, MALAYSIA

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