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Presidential Statements 2015

Presidential Statements 2015 (26)

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7599th meeting of the Security Council, held on 31 December 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “United Nations peacekeeping operations”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

                     “The Security Council recalls the issue of consultations between the Security Council, troop- and police-contributing countries and the Secretariat (triangular consultations), and the Report of its Working Group of the Whole on United Nations Peacekeeping Operations on the Enhancement of Cooperation with Troop- and Police-Contributing Countries and Other Stakeholders of 17 December 2009 (S/2009/659), its resolutions 1353 (2001) and 2086 (2013), the Notes of its President of 26 July 2010 (2010/507) and 28 October 2013 (S/2013/630) and the Statement by its President of 25 November 2015 (S/PRST/2015/22).

 

                     “The Security Council takes note of the recommendations of the Secretary-General’s report entitled ‘The Future of United Nations Peace Operations: Implementation of the Recommendations of the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations’ (S/2015/682) and of the recommendations of the report of the High-level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (S/2015/446), with respect to consultations between the Security Council, troop- and police-contributing countries and the Secretariat. The Security Council notes in particular, the view of the High-Level Independent Panel and the Secretary General, that the lack of effective dialogue through consultations between these three stakeholders has generated frustration on all sides and has undermined mandate implementation.

 

                     “The Security Council takes note of the views expressed at the ninth meeting of its Working Group on the theme “Towards a Strategic Dialogue between the Security Council, troop- and police-contributing countries and the Secretariat” held on 11 December 2015 under Chad’s chairmanship.

 

                     “The Security Council recognizes that sustained consultations with the Secretariat and troop- and police-contributing countries are essential for a shared understanding of appropriate responses and their implications for the mandate and conduct of an operation. In this regard, the Security Council recalls the many mechanisms that exist to facilitate consultations among the Security Council, troop- and police-contributing countries and the Secretariat, particularly the Working Group, formal and informal consultations with troop- and police-contributing countries as well as the role of the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and the Military Staff Committee. The Security Council recognizes that, despite the existence of these mechanisms, current consultations among these three stakeholders do not meet their expectations and have yet to reach their full potential.

 

                     “The Security Council recognizes that the experience and expertise of troop- and police-contributing countries in theatres of operation can greatly assist the planning of operations. The Security Council stresses the importance of substantive, representative and meaningful exchanges and underscores the importance of full participation by the three stakeholders so that meetings are useful and productive. The Security Council acknowledges the importance of effective consultations among the Security Council, troop- and police-contributing countries and the Secretariat, and that these consultations must extend beyond the issue of mandates of operations, and to areas such as safety and security of peacekeepers, strategic force generation, gender, conduct and discipline, including allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, implementation of protection of civilian mandates, capability, performance, equipment and national caveats.

 

                     “The Security Council recalls its Presidential Statement of 31 January 2001 (S/PRST/2001/3), by which it established its Working Group to, where appropriate, seek the views of troop- and police-contributing countries, including through meetings between the Working Group and troop- and police-contributing countries, with their views being taken into account by the Security Council. The Security Council stresses the usefulness of full and comprehensive briefings by the Secretariat at private meetings and the importance of full participation by all those involved including troop- and police-contributing countries taking the initiative to call for meaningful exchanges of information. The Security Council views consultations with troop- and police-contributing countries as an opportunity to set expectations for the required capabilities, performance standards, and timelines, as well as to understand the limitations of troop- and police-contributing countries. Recalling operative paragraph 7 of resolution 2242 (2015), the Security Council underlines that such briefings must include the appropriate information in order to ensure that a gender perspective is taken into account in the planning of new missions and the review of existing ones.

 

                     “The Security Council encourages the Secretariat to further provide to relevant troop- and police-contributing countries, information, as appropriate and in a timely manner, in particular related to critical security incidents within missions. The Security Council welcomes developments in the informal approach to consultations between the three stakeholders, as reflected in the Report on the activities of its Working Group on Peacekeeping Operations for the period 1 January to 31 December 2015 (S/2015/1050). The Security Council strongly encourages its members to continue to hold and further develop such informal, interactive and focused consultations with the Secretariat and troop- and police-contributing countries.

 

                     “The Security Council underscores that sustained consultations with potential troop- and police-contributing countries prior to the establishment and during the lifecycle of a mission, are important for a shared understanding of the mandates and a common commitment to their implementation, recognizing that such consultations should not delay the establishment of a mission. The Security Council emphasizes the importance of holding inclusive and meaningful consultations on a regular basis with the Secretariat and troop- and police-contributing countries at senior levels, including with specialized personnel, experts and high-level military officials, as needed, the aim of which should be to ensure a shared understanding among the Secretariat and potential contributors on required capabilities, resulting in commitments to deliver on the mandate and concept of operations.

 

                     “The Security Council invites the Secretariat to brief potential troop- and police-contributing countries, as needed, together with Security Council members on its assessment of a conflict and potential mandate options before an operation is authorized, with a view to allowing the consideration of capabilities required and giving the Council an opportunity to obtain insights on the challenges and opportunities involved in mandating certain tasks and in generating the required capabilities under specific time frames. The Security Council also invites the Secretariat to regularly brief troop- and police-contributing countries, through existing mechanisms when appropriate, and emphasizes the importance of a full exchange of views on the operational challenges being faced by troop- and police-contributing countries. The Security Council welcomes in this regard the establishment of the Strategic Force Generation and Capability Planning Cell. The Security Council requests the Secretariat to regularly brief troop- and police-contributing countries, together with the Security Council, and seek their views, including of their uniformed personnel deployed on the ground, in assessing progress once the mandate of a peace operation is established.

 

                     “The Security Council recognizes that the success of peacekeeping operations will increasingly require strong collaboration between the United Nations and regional and subregional organizations from the outset and in this regard encourages the Secretariat, and expresses its readiness as appropriate to consult with relevant regional organizations, particularly the African Union, especially if transitioning from a regional to United Nations peacekeeping operation. The Security Council strongly encourages the Secretariat to consult with troop- and police-contributing countries in a timely manner when planning any change in military tasks, mission-specific rules of engagement, concept of operations or command and control structure or early peacebuilding that would have an impact on the personnel, equipment, training and logistics requirements, so as to enable troop- and police-contributing countries to contribute their advice during the planning process and to ensure that their personnel have the capacity to meet the new demands. The Security Council calls on the Secretary-General to ensure that heads of mission, force commanders and police commissioners engage early with senior civilian and military staff of the mission on changes to a mandate in advance of the issuance of a new concept of operations and directives, to ensure unity of understanding of mandate changes and better mandate implementation across the mission, and to ensure that operational commanders’ views are considered during this process.

 

                     “The Security Council takes note of the intention of the Secretary-General to provide briefings to the Security Council on conduct, discipline, and performance issues that undermine implementation of the mandate, including failure of troop- and police-contributing countries to implement the mandated tasks and on implementation of protection of civilians’ mandates and allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, as well as the Secretary-General’s intention to inform the Security Council appropriately, and notes the importance of these issues for triangular consultations. The Security Council also notes the importance of the issues of capabilities and performance requirements for triangular consultations, through a thorough common understanding of the tasks to be performed by missions, and in this regard calls on the Secretariat, to assist troop- and police-contributing countries by clarifying these requirements, and welcomes ongoing support by member states to troop-and police-contributing countries in meeting these requirements. The Security Council encourages troop- and police-contributing countries to communicate, during negotiations in respect of possible deployment, national caveats regarding the use of military or police contingents and emphasizes that these caveats will be taken into account in the decision making process when selecting forces, including whether to proceed with deployment.

 

                     “The Security Council, including through its Working Group, remains committed to further discussions to enhance triangular consultations, particularly its partnership with troop- and police-contributing countries, and to take forward the undertakings of this Presidential Statement. Recalling its resolution 1353 (2001) and related presidential statements, the Security Council expresses its readiness to further develop the process of informal consultation sessions with troop- and police-contributing countries on an ongoing basis and in advance of mandate renewals and urges troop- and police-contributing countries to provide their views on this issue by 31 March 2016, including through its Working Group.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7568th meeting of the Security Council, held on 25 November 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “Protection of civilians in armed conflict”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

“The Security Council reaffirms its commitment regarding the protection of civilians in armed conflict, and to the continuing and full implementation of all its previous relevant resolutions including resolutions 1265 (1999), 1296 (2000), 1674 (2006), 1738 (2006), 1894 (2009), and 2222 (2015), as well as all of its resolutions on women, peace and security, children and armed conflict, and peacekeeping, and all relevant statements of its President.

 

“The Security Council expresses its outrage that civilians continue to account for the vast majority of casualties in situations of armed conflict and at the various short and long term impacts that conflict continues to have on civilians, including forced displacement, and damage to and destruction of civilian property and livelihoods.

 

“The Security Council reaffirms its strong condemnation of violations of international humanitarian law committed by all parties to armed conflict, as well as violations and abuses of international human rights law, as applicable, and calls upon all parties to comply with their legal obligations.  The Security Council recalls the importance of ensuring compliance with international humanitarian law and international human rights law, ending impunity for violations and abuses, and ensuring accountability.

 

“The Security Council underscores the importance it attaches to the Protection of Civilians as one of the core issues on its agenda, and expresses its intention to continue addressing this issue regularly, both in country-specific considerations and as a thematic item.

 

“The Security Council recognizes the contribution of the updated Aide Memoire for the consideration of issues pertaining to the protection of civilians in armed conflict*, contained in the annex to this statement, to the protection of civilians, and as a practical tool that provides a basis for improved analysis and diagnosis of key protection issues, and stresses the need to continue its use on a more systematic and consistent basis.

 

“The Security Council takes note of with appreciation the report of the Secretary-General on the protection of civilians in armed conflict of 18 June 2015 (S/2015/453) and the recommendations contained therein, and reiterates the need for systematic monitoring and reporting on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, and the challenges and progress made in this regard.  The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to submit his next report on the protection of civilians in armed conflict by 15 May 2016 and to submit future reports every 12 months thereafter, to be formally considered by the Security Council each year within the same General Assembly session.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7585th meeting of the Security Council, held on 16 December 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “Maintenance of international peace and security”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

                      “The Security Council recalls its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations.

 

                      “The Security Council recalls the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, and its Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, which includes the first internationally agreed definition of the crime of trafficking in persons and provides a framework to effectively prevent and combat trafficking in persons.

 

                      “The Security Council condemns in the strongest terms reported instances of trafficking in persons in areas affected by armed conflict. The Security Council further notes that trafficking in persons undermines the rule of law and contributes to other forms of transnational organized crime, which can exacerbate conflict and foster insecurity.

 

                      “The Security Council deplores all acts of trafficking in persons undertaken by the ‘Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant’ (ISIL, also known as Da’esh), including of Yazidis, as well as all ISIL’s violations of international humanitarian law and abuses of human rights, and deplores also any such trafficking in persons and violations and other abuses by the Lord’s Resistance Army, and other terrorist or armed groups, including Boko Haram, for the purpose of sexual slavery, sexual exploitation, and forced labor which may contribute to the funding and sustainment of such groups, and underscores that certain acts associated with trafficking in persons in the context of armed conflict may constitute war crimes.

 

                      “The Security Council reiterates the critical importance of all Member States fully implementing relevant resolutions with respect to ISIL, including resolutions 2161 (2014), 2170 (2014), 2178 (2014), 2199 (2015) and 2249 (2015). The Security Council further reiterates the critical importance of all Member States fully implementing relevant resolutions, including resolution 2195 (2014), which expresses concern that terrorists benefit from transnational organized crime in some regions, including from the trafficking of persons, as well as resolution 2242 (2015) which expresses concern that acts of sexual and gender-based violence are known to be part of the strategic objectives and ideology of certain terrorist groups.

 

                      “The Security Council calls upon Member States to reinforce their political commitment to and improve their implementation of applicable legal obligations to criminalize, prevent, and otherwise combat trafficking in persons, and to strengthen efforts to detect and disrupt trafficking in persons, including implementing robust victim identification mechanisms and providing access to protection and assistance for identified victims, particularly in relation to conflict. The Security Council underscores in this regard the importance of international law enforcement cooperation, including with respect to investigation and prosecution of trafficking cases and in this regard calls for the continued support of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in providing technical assistance upon request.

 

                      “The Security Council calls upon Member States to consider ratifying or acceding to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children. The Security Council further calls upon States Parties to this Convention and to the Protocol to redouble their efforts to implement them effectively.

 

                      “The Security Council takes note of the recommendations made by the Working Group on Trafficking in Persons, established by the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, since its inception, and calls upon States to strengthen their efforts in building the necessary political, economic and social conditions to tackle this crime.

 

                      “The Security Council notes the particular impact that trafficking in persons in situations of armed conflict has on women and children, including increasing their vulnerability to sexual and gender based violence. The Security Council expresses its intention to continue to address this impact, including, as appropriate, in the context of its Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict, within its mandate, and in the framework of its agenda to prevent and address sexual violence in armed conflict.

 

                      “The Security Council expresses solidarity with and compassion for victims of trafficking, including victims of trafficking related to armed conflicts worldwide and underscores the need for Member States and the UN System to proactively identify trafficking victims amongst vulnerable populations, including refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs), and address comprehensively victims’ needs, including proactive victim identification and, as appropriate, the provision of or access to medical and psycho-social assistance, in the context of the UN peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts, as well as ensure that victims of trafficking in persons are treated as victims of crime and in line with domestic legislation not penalized or stigmatized for their involvement in any unlawful activities in which they have been compelled to engage.

 

                      “The Security Council calls upon Member States to hold accountable those who engage in trafficking in persons in situations of armed conflict, especially their government employees and officials, as well as any contractors and subcontractors, and urges Member States to take all appropriate steps to mitigate the risk that their public procurement and supply chains may contribute to trafficking in persons in situations of armed conflict.

 

                      “The Security Council welcomes existing efforts to address sexual exploitation and abuse in the context of UN peacekeeping missions, and requests the Secretary-General to identify and take additional steps to prevent and respond robustly to reports of trafficking in persons in UN peacekeeping operations, with the objective of ensuring accountability for exploitation.

 

                      “The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to take all appropriate steps to reduce to the greatest extent possible the risk that the UN’s procurement and supply chains may contribute to the trafficking in persons in situations of armed conflict.

 

                      “The Security Council urges relevant UN agencies operating in armed conflict and post-conflict situations to build their technical capacity to assess conflict situations for instances of trafficking in persons, proactively screen for potential victims of trafficking, and facilitate access to needed services for identified victims.

 

                      “The Security Council expresses its intent to continue to address trafficking in persons with respect to the situations on its seizure list.

 

                      “The Security Council requests that the Secretary-General report back to the Council on progress made in 12 months to implement better existing mechanisms countering trafficking in persons and to carry out steps requested in this Presidential Statement.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7571st meeting of the Security Council, held on 8 December 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “Peace and security in Africa”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

           “The Security Council takes note of the report (S/2015/866) of the Secretary-General on the progress toward the implementation of the United Nations Integrated Strategy for the Sahel (UNISS) and welcomes the briefing on 25 November 2015 by the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General (SESG) for the Sahel, Ms. Hiroute Guebre Sellassie. The Security Council encourages further progress by the United Nations system and its partners toward the implementation of the UNISS, including through support to the Group of 5 for the Sahel (G5 Sahel) in order to assist in addressing the security and political challenges to the stability and development of the Sahel region. The Security Council reaffirms its continued commitment to address all these challenges, which are interrelated with humanitarian and development issues as well as the adverse effects of climate and ecological changes. The Security Council reiterates the importance of national and regional ownership of the UNISS, and commends the growing leadership role assumed by the countries of the region. It welcomes in this regard, the establishment of the G5 Sahel, which aims to enhance ownership of the initiatives focused on addressing the threats to peace, security and development in the Sahel.

 

           “The Security Council encourages the Office of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for the Sahel (OSES) to continue to work closely with the G5 Sahel countries as well as other countries of the region, regional and international actors including the African Union (AU) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) to tackle the threats to peace, security and development in the Sahel as well as their root causes. The Security Council encourages greater cooperation among all stakeholders including the AU and ECOWAS, calls on them to collaborate with the OSES, and the Secretariat of the G5 Sahel as well as the G5 Sahel countries, and reiterates its call for the rapid and effective implementation of the UNISS.

 

           “The Security Council is gravely concerned that Libya remains a safe haven for terrorist groups operating in the Sahel region, and expresses deep concern at the threat posed by the widespread availability of unsecured arms and ammunition and their proliferation, which undermines stability in Libya and the Sahel region, including through transfer to terrorist and violent extremist groups. In this regard, the Security Council calls on the international community to provide support to Libya and its neighbors in the Sahel, including by providing them with the necessary security and capacity building assistance in the struggle against Al-Qaida linked terrorist groups and individuals. The Security Council calls on all Libyan stakeholders to endorse and sign the Political Agreement and work swiftly towards the formation of a Government of National Accord.

 

           “The Security Council urges Member States of the Sahel, West Africa and the Maghreb, to coordinate their efforts to prevent the serious threat posed to international and regional security by terrorist groups crossing borders and seeking safe havens in the Sahel region, to enhance cooperation and coordination in order to develop holistic, inclusive and effective strategies to combat in a comprehensive and integrated manner the activities of terrorist groups, and to prevent the expansion of those groups as well as to limit the proliferation of all arms and transnational organized crime. The Security Council welcomes the efforts of the AU and ECOWAS as well as of Member States of the Sahel to strengthen border security and regional cooperation, including through the G5 Sahel and the Nouakchott process on the enhancement of the security cooperation and the operationalization of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) in the Sahel and Sahara region, the most inclusive security cooperation mechanism in the region. It takes note of the establishment by the G5 Sahel countries of a framework to strengthen regional security cooperation as well as to conduct cross-border joint military operations, including with the support of the French Forces.

 

           “The Security Council reaffirms that Member States must ensure that any measures taken to counter terrorism comply with all their obligations under international law, in particular international human rights law, international refugee law, and international humanitarian law. The Security Council recalls that those responsible for abuses and violations of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law must be held accountable and brought to justice.

 

           “The Security Council calls for funding for humanitarian programmes in the Sahel region which continue to be underfunded, hampering timely responses to humanitarian needs. The Security Council expresses its concern at the scale of the growing humanitarian crisis caused by the activities of the Boko Haram terrorist group, which has displaced over 2.5 million people including an estimated 1.4 million children and 200,000 refugees in Cameroon, Chad and Niger. It commends the support provided to the refugees by these Governments, including with the assistance of humanitarian actors and relevant United Nations entities, and calls on the international community to provide its support.

 

           “The Security Council commends the AU, ECOWAS and the Lake Chad Basin Commission Member States’ as well as Benin’s courageous and active contribution to peace and stability in the Sahel region and in particular, pays tribute to the engagement of their soldiers in Mali and in the fight against Boko Haram. The Security Council notes that the creation of the Multinational Joint Task force (MNJTF) has led to steady progress in the fight against Boko Haram. The Security Council reiterates its call upon the international community and donors to support the MNJTF. The Security Council reiterates its call on Member States to contribute generously to the African Union Trust Fund and requests the Secretary-General to continue to advocate strongly with the international community and donors in support of this effort. It calls on the African Union to establish its Trust Fund without further delay.

 

           “The Security Council recalls the importance of coordinating the effective implementation of Sahel initiatives and strategies, and commends in this regard Mali for its chairmanship of the Ministerial Coordination Platform over the last two years. It encourages Chad, as the new chair to intensify efforts to improve coordination between partners, including through the regular sharing of information and the strengthening of operational cooperation between partners.

 

           “The Security Council calls on the international community and donors to fulfill all their pledges made towards boosting economic growth, eradicating poverty and supporting governance reforms, through projects that would support peace and security efforts in the Sahel region and calls on all relevant entities of the United Nations system to focus on identifying and funding such projects, as a matter of priority, in consultation with the OSES and the Member States of the Sahel including the G5 Sahel Member States and relevant regional organizations.

 

           “The Security Council calls upon the Member States of the Sahel region, with the support of the international community, to initiate programmes aimed at creating opportunities that would engage the youth in productive activities to reverse the tide of radicalization and recruitment into terrorist groups. It also calls on the OSES to support as a matter of priority, efforts focused at creating opportunities for youth and women. The Security Council expresses strong support to the States in the region affected by the smuggling of migrants and human trafficking, emphasizes the need to step up coordination of efforts in order to strengthen an effective multidimensional response to these common challenges, and stresses that addressing both smuggling of migrants and human trafficking requires a coordinated, multidimensional approach with States of origin, of transit, and of destination.

 

           “The Security Council takes note of the organization of the Sahel Women’s Forum in N’Djamena, Chad, on 22 and 23 July 2015 to strengthen the role of women in the Sahel region and encourages the Member States of the region to enhance the active participation of women in decision-making. The Security Council also takes note of the organization in N’Djamena, Chad, on 19 and 20 November 2015, of a G5 Sahel and partners Ministerial meeting and an ordinary Summit of the G5 Sahel respectively.

 

           “Recognizing the strong nexus between peace, security, good governance and development, the Security Council encourages regional and international financial organizations to provide a substantial financial assistance package to countries of the region to boost economic growth and reduce poverty. The Security Council welcomes plans by the United Nations to establish a
Multi-Partner Trust Fund for the Sahel (S-MPTF), in order to pool contributions including from donor countries and the private sector, to support the region’s efforts. The Security Council notes the active resource mobilization efforts of the SESG to continue to engage with potential donor countries and organizations to accelerate the implementation of selected regional projects in consultation with the Member States of the Sahel region including the G5 Sahel Member States and relevant regional organizations.

 

           “The Security Council takes note of the adoption of a Declaration of the G5 Sahel countries on the Fight against Radicalization and Violent Extremism in the Sahel. The Security Council requests the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF) and its member entities, including the Counter Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate as well as the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre, to support Sahel countries efforts to counter terrorism and address conditions conducive to the spread of violent extremism which can be conducive to terrorism. It calls on the CTITF to explore expanding its I-ACT Initiative to all the countries of the G5-Sahel. The Security Council recalls that the 1540 Committee as its subsidiary body remains committed to supporting States, including the Sahel States, that require assistance in their efforts to comply with the obligations contained in resolution 1540 (2004). The Security Council calls on the United Nations to accelerate action to also support the G5 Sahel in the implementation of the African Union’s “Silencing the guns” flagship project, consistent with its presidential statement of 16 December 2014 (S/PRST/2014/27).

 

           “The Security Council strongly encourages another high-level visit to the Sahel region as soon as possible by the United Nations Secretary-General, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission, the President of the World Bank Group, the President of the African Development Bank and the European Union Development Commissioner, to assess the implementation of the vision set out during the November 2013 visit, and to strengthen the focus and commitment of the international community in the region.

 

           “The Security Council notes with satisfaction the series of consultations between the United Nations, the G5 Sahel and its Permanent Secretariat, which helped promote convergence between the UNISS and the Priority Investment Programme (PIP) of the G5 Sahel, and led to a roadmap for consolidating cooperation between the two entities. The Security Council calls on the OSES to continue to coordinate with the national focal points appointed by the G5 Sahel, and calls on the United Nations Secretariat to hold at least one meeting per quarter with the Permanent Representatives of the G5 Member States in New York, to share information and follow up on the implementation of the UNISS. The Security Council encourages the SESG to continue to meet with the officials of the G5 Member States to discuss developments in the region, activities of the OSES, and progress toward the implementation of the UNISS as well as the priorities of the G5 Member States.

 

           “The Security Council looks forward to considering the recommendations of the Secretary-General’s strategic review of the OSES to be conducted in December 2015, and requests the inclusion of recommendations on the location of the OSES, in consultation with the Member States of the Sahel region including the G5 Sahel Member States and regional and international actors, bearing in mind the need to more fully and directly anchor the implementation of the UNISS in the region including the five priority countries, namely Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger as well as to maximize synergies with the relevant entities of the United Nations system.

 

           “The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to inform it of the progress toward the implementation of the UNISS through oral briefings as needed, as well as through a report and a briefing no later than 31 October 2016. The Security Council also requests the Secretary-General to include in his report, detailed information on the financial contributions towards boosting economic growth and eradicating poverty, through projects that would support peace and security efforts in the Sahel region, noted in paragraph 26 of his report of 24 July 2014 (A/69/162-S/2014/542) and recommendations for strengthening Sahel Member States’ capabilities to prevent drivers of violent extremism which can be conducive to terrorism. The Security Council encourages the SESG to pursue her efforts and good offices in order to enhance regional and interregional cooperation and strengthen coordinated international assistance to the countries of the Sahel region in close coordination with the Special Representatives of the Secretary-General for West and Central Africa. In this regard, the Security Council welcomes updates on the overall situation in the Sahel region in the Secretary-General’s regular reports on the situations in West and Central Africa.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7567th meeting of the Security Council, held on 25 November 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “Maintenance of international peace and security”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

                     “The Security Council recalls the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, and reaffirms its primary responsibility under the Charter for the maintenance of international peace and security.

 

                     “The Security Council reaffirms the basic principles of peacekeeping: consent of the parties, impartiality, and non-use of force, except in self-defense and defense of the mandate; and the Security Council recognizes that the mandate of each peacekeeping operation is specific to the needs and situation of the country concerned. In this regard, the Security Council underlines that the basic principles are consistent with the mandates that it authorizes that seek to tackle new challenges faced by peacekeeping operations, such as force protection and safety and security, protection of civilians, and asymmetric threats, and that the Security Council expects full delivery of the mandates it authorizes.

 

                     “The Security Council welcomes the Secretary-General’s efforts to advance the cause of reform as well as the initiative of the Secretary-General to undertake a comprehensive review of United Nations peace operations in an effort to consider measures to further strengthen the role, capacity, effectiveness, accountability and efficiency of the United Nations system, including its peace operations and in this regard welcomes the appointment by the Secretary-General of the High-level Independent Panel on Peace Operations and the wide and significant consultations undertaken by the Panel with diverse groups and stakeholders.

 

                     “The Security Council takes note of the recommendations of his report entitled ‘The Future of United Nations Peace Operations: Implementation of the Recommendations of the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations’ (S/2015/682) and of the recommendations of the report of the High-level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (S/2015/446), including the recommendations with respect to the strategic partnership with the African Union. The Security Council commends the commitment of the Secretary-General to continue to undertake steps, including within the Secretariat and in consultation with Member States, host states, Troop- and Police-Contributing Countries, and the Security Council, in order to improve United Nations peace operations.

 

                     “The Security Council notes that the Secretary-General’s report (S/2015/682) identifies a number of areas where the Security Council could play a key role in strengthening United Nations peace operations and expresses its intention to continue to consider the relevant recommendations of the Secretary-General’s report. In this regard, the Security Council welcomes the initiative of the Secretary-General to brief the Council on 20 November 2015 on recommendations for further consideration by the Security Council, as well as other intergovernmental formats. The Security Council underscores the critical importance of improving the accountability, transparency and performance of United Nations peace operations.

 

                     “The Security Council underlines the significant impact its statements and actions can exert in situations of armed conflict or in support of peace processes. The Security Council recalls resolution 2171 (2014) and reiterates its commitment to take early and effective action to prevent armed conflict and to that end to employ all appropriate means at its disposal, in accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations.

 

                     “The Security Council welcomes and reaffirms its commitment to cooperation between the United Nations and regional and sub-regional organisations and arrangements in matters relating to the maintenance of international peace and security, and consistent with Chapter VIII of the Charter of the United Nations, which can improve collective security. The Security Council notes the strategic partnership between the United Nations and the African Union and, in this regard, looks forward to the results of the Secretary-General’s review and assessment of various mechanisms currently available to support African Union peace operations authorised by the Security Council. The Security Council stresses the need to secure more financial resources from within the African continent, without prejudice to the support from the United Nations and other partners. The Security Council encourages regional and sub-regional organisations involved in peace processes, to keep the Security Council informed of developments, where relevant. The Security Council encourages the Secretary-General to ensure that, where applicable, the United Nations is involved at the early stages of peace processes and keeps the Security Council informed on the parameters of United Nations involvement in such peace processes.

 

                     “The Security Council recalls its determination to upgrade its situational awareness and strategic oversight of United Nations peacekeeping operations, mindful of the important role peacekeeping operations play for the protection of civilians. The Security Council reaffirms its support to the efforts of the Secretary-General to review peacekeeping operations and to provide enhanced planning and support and renews its encouragement to deepen these efforts, in partnership with Troop- and Police-Contributing Countries and other relevant stakeholders. The Security Council welcomes the commitment of the Secretary-General to keep it informed, on a regular basis, of situations of escalating risk to civilians in the countries where United Nations peace missions are deployed, serious shortfalls in the capability of missions to fulfill their mandates and of any incident in which a mission or uniformed personnel or unit fails to act to implement their mandate, including to protect civilians while bearing in mind that States bear the primary responsibility to protect civilians.

 

                     “The Security Council will pursue more prioritisation when evaluating, mandating and reviewing United Nations peace operations in order to enhance the effectiveness of such operations, including through consultation with Troop- and Police Contributing Countries, regional and sub-regional organizations and other relevant stakeholders. The Security Council encourages the Secretary-General to strengthen his engagement and reporting to the Council by emphasising enhanced analysis and planning, including on safety and security, so as to facilitate the Council’s prioritisation. The Security Council will consider sequenced and phased mandates, where appropriate, when evaluating existing United Nations peace operations or establishing new United Nations peace operations.

 

                     “The Security Council affirms that proper conduct by, and discipline over, all personnel deployed in United Nations peace operations are crucial to their effectiveness. In particular, the Security Council underscores that sexual exploitation and abuse by United Nations peacekeepers is unacceptable and affirms its support for the United Nations zero tolerance policy on all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse. The Security Council welcomes the Secretary-General’s proposals to strengthen the Organisation’s prevention, enforcement and remediation efforts for all forms of misconduct and reiterates its request to the Secretary-General to include a section on conduct and discipline, including, whenever relevant, adherence to his zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse, in all his thematic reports and reports on country-specific situations to the Security Council. The Security Council reaffirms the primary responsibility of Troop- and Police-Contributing Countries to investigate allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse against their uniformed personnel and calls on them to ensure that allegations of misconduct are investigated promptly, criminal accountability is enforced and that the United Nations is informed in a timely manner of the status and outcome of all investigations. The Security Council asks the Secretariat to keep Troop- and Police-Contributing Countries fully informed as soon as allegations against peacekeepers are made and stresses the need for full and appropriate reporting within the United Nations system. The Security Council also encourages the Secretary-General to continue his efforts to ensure that mechanisms are available and widely known for victims to register complaints confidentially, and that feedback to victims is provided.

 

                     “The Security Council recalls its high-level review of resolution 1325 (2000) and its commitments through resolution 2242 (2015), notes the report of the Advisory Group of Experts on the Review of the Peacebuilding Architecture (S/2012/490), encourages coherence, synergies and complementarities among the on-going reviews of the United Nations peace and security architecture, and reiterates the importance of cooperation between all relevant United Nations organs to further consider these reviews, as appropriate and in accordance with established procedures and in compliance with their respective purview.

 

                     “The Security Council encourages the Secretary-General to take forward those steps under his authority he has set out to take to contribute to improving United Nations peace operations, in areas such as enhancing analysis and planning, strengthening reporting to the Council, reinforcing partnerships and cooperation with regional organisations, strategic force generation, improving leadership and accountability, measures aimed to reduce incidents of sexual exploitation and abuse, and measures to improve the strategic partnership with the African Union. The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to provide it with updates on progress in these areas.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7559th meeting of the Security Council, held on 16 November 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991; International Criminal Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Genocide and Other Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Rwanda and Rwandan Citizens Responsible for Genocide and Other Such Violations Committed in the Territory of Neighbouring States between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 1994”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

                     “The Security Council recalls its resolution 1966 (2010) of 22 December 2010, establishing the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals to carry out, in accordance with the provisions of the Statute annexed to that resolution (“the Statute”) and the Transitional Arrangements in Annex 2 to resolution 1966 (2010), residual functions of the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991 (“ICTY”) and the International Criminal Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Genocide and Other Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Rwanda and Rwandan citizens responsible for genocide and other such violations committed in the territory of neighboring States, between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 1994 (“ICTR”).

 

                     “The Security Council also recalls that, in view of the substantially reduced nature of the residual functions, the Mechanism should be a small, temporary and efficient structure, whose functions and size will diminish over time, with a small number of staff commensurate with its reduced functions.

 

                     “The Security Council further recalls its decision that the Mechanism shall operate for an initial period of four years starting from 1 July 2012, and its decision to review the progress of the work of the Mechanism, including in completing its functions, before the end of this initial period and every two years thereafter, and its further decision that the Mechanism shall continue to operate for subsequent periods of two years following each such review, unless the Security Council decides otherwise.

 

                     “The Security Council notes the Mechanism’s annual reports to the Security Council and to the General Assembly and its six-monthly reports to the Security Council on the progress of the Mechanism, submitted in accordance with Article 32 of the Statute.

 

                     “The Security Council requests the Mechanism to present by 20 November 2015 its report on the progress of its work in the initial period including in completing its functions with detailed schedules for the proceedings currently under consideration as well as factors relevant to projected completion dates for the cases and other matters over which the Mechanism has jurisdiction, including in accordance with Transitional Arrangements in Annex 2 resolution 1966 (2010), (“the report”).

 

                     “The Security Council requests the Informal Working Group on International Tribunals to carry out, including by reference to an executive summary of available and relevant UN Office of Internal Oversight Services (“UN OIOS”) reports, a thorough examination of the Mechanism’s report and to present its views and any findings or recommendations for the Council’s consideration in its review of the work of the Mechanism, including in completing its functions with efficiency and effective management. This review will be completed by 21 December 2015 and its outcome shall be reflected by the Security Council in an appropriate form.

 

                     “The Security Council notes that the process described in paragraph 6 of the present statement, with any findings or recommendations adopted by the Security Council, shall constitute the review of the work of the Mechanism, as indicated in paragraph 17 of resolution 1966 (2010). It further underlines that this process shall include in the next reviews evaluation reports sought from the UN OIOS with respect to the methods and work of the Mechanism.

 

                     “The Security Council further notes that the Informal Working Group on International Tribunals may formulate, if necessary, additional questions to be addressed in the report of the Mechanism requested according to the present Statement.

 

                     “The Security Council stresses its ongoing determination to combat impunity for those responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law and the necessity that all persons indicted by the ICTY and ICTR are brought to justice.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7552nd meeting of the Security Council, held on 9 November 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “The situation concerning the Democratic Republic of the Congo”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

           “The Security Council welcomes the appointment of Maman S. Sidikou as Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Head of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO), and assures him of its full support. The Security Council commends his predecessor Martin Kobler for his engagement and important contribution for the past two years in supporting the implementation of the MONUSCO mandate.

 

           “The Security Council notes some progress was made with respect to the security situation in eastern DRC over the last fourteen years but remains deeply concerned over the ongoing security and humanitarian crisis due to ongoing destabilizing activity of foreign and domestic armed groups. The Security Council stresses once again the utmost importance of neutralizing, once and for all, armed groups in the DRC, in particular the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR) as well as the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), the Front for Patriotic Resistance of Ituri (FRPI) and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), and reiterates the importance of the extension of state authority over territory vacated by armed groups and of the effective disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former combatants.

 

           “The Security Council acknowledges the importance of joint operations and notes with concern that joint offensive operations between FARDC and the Intervention Brigade in cooperation with the whole of MONUSCO have yet to resume. The Security Council calls for the immediate resumption of full cooperation in order to jointly neutralize armed groups in the DRC, in particular the FDLR, as mandated by its resolution 2211.

 

           “The Security Council reiterates its concern at the slow pace of implementation of the Peace, Security and Cooperation Framework Agreement for DRC and the Region signed in Addis Ababa in February 2013, and of the Nairobi Declarations of December 2013, and calls on all parties, including the ex-M23 leadership, to fully cooperate to expedite the repatriation and reintegration of remaining ex-M23 combatants in Uganda and Rwanda and to participate in the follow-up mechanisms for the implementation of the Nairobi Declarations.

 

           “The Security Council remains deeply concerned by persistent high levels of violence and violations and abuses of human rights and international law, especially in eastern DRC. The Security Council condemns in particular such violations and abuses involving targeted attacks against civilians, widespread sexual and gender-based violence, systematic recruitment and use of children by armed groups, forced displacement of significant numbers of civilians, extrajudicial executions and arbitrary arrests. The Security Council acknowledges the progress made by the Government of the DRC in the implementation of the action plans to prevent and end the recruitment and use of children as well as sexual violence by the FARDC, and calls on the Government to continue its efforts, with the support of MONUSCO, towards their full implementation, including combating impunity for sexual violence and violations against children. The Security Council urges the Government of the DRC to continue its efforts to bring to justice and hold accountable those responsible for violations of international humanitarian law or violations and abuses of human rights, as applicable, in particular those that may amount to genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.

 

           “The Security Council calls on the Government of the DRC and its national partners to ensure the successful and timely holding of elections, in particular presidential and legislative elections by November 2016, in accordance with the Constitution, while respecting the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance. The Security Council reiterates its concern over the increasing political tensions in the DRC and urges the Government as well as all relevant parties to ensure an environment conducive to a free, fair, credible, inclusive, transparent, peaceful and timely electoral process, in accordance with the Congolese Constitution, which will contribute to the long-term stability and development of the DRC.

 

           “The Security Council takes note with encouragement of the Government of the DRC’s stated commitment to engage fully in the strategic dialogue with MONUSCO consistent with resolution 2211 (2015) and looks forward to the quick resumption of talks. The Security Council reiterates its full support to MONUSCO and calls on all parties to cooperate fully with the mission and to remain committed to the full and objective implementation of the mission’s mandate. The Security Council expresses its full support to incoming SRSG Sidikou to that end.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7547th meeting of the Security Council, held on 30 October 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “Implementation of the note by the President of the Security Council (S/2010/507)”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

           “The Security Council welcomes the continued participation by the wider membership in the open debate held on 20 October 2015 under the agenda item ‘Implementation of the note by the President of the Security Council (S/2010/507)’.

 

           “The Security Council expresses its intent to continue to hold an annual open debate on its working methods and affirms its commitment to continue to keep its working methods under consideration in its regular work, with a view to ensuring their effective and consistent implementation.

 

           “The Security Council recalls its commitment to making more effective use, as appropriate, of open meetings, and to this end expresses its commitment to continue to take steps to improve the focus and interactivity of its open debates. In this regard, the Security Council welcomes joint statements by both Security Council members and other Member States.

 

           “The Security Council underscores the importance of increased coordination, cooperation and interaction among the principal organs of the United Nations, in particular the Security Council, the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and the Secretariat, as well as with other relevant bodies including the Peacebuilding Commission, and regional organisations, including the African Union, and reaffirms that the relationship between the principal organs of the United Nations is mutually reinforcing and complementary, in accordance with and with full respect for their respective functions, authority, powers and competencies as enshrined in the Charter. In this regard, the Security Council takes note of the adoption, on 11 September 2015, by the General Assembly, of resolution 69/321 and the continued cooperation between the President of the Security Council and the President of the General Assembly.

 

           “The Security Council appreciates the work undertaken by the Informal Working Group on Documentation and Other Procedural Questions, and requests the Informal Working Group to continue reviewing and updating relevant Notes by the President of the Security Council,in particular Note S/2010/507 of 26 July 2010, including with a focus on implementation.

 

           “The Security Council takes note of the efforts of the Informal Working Group on Documentation and Other Procedural Questions to enhance the transparency of its activities, including by the Chair providing regular briefings to interested Member States, in consultation with its members, and encourages the Working Group to make further progress in this regard.

 

           “The Security Council further appreciates the efforts on working methods undertaken by its other subsidiary bodies aimed at enhancing the effectiveness and transparency of their activities, and encourages them, as appropriate, to make further progress.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7546th meeting of the Security Council, held on 28 October 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “The situation in Burundi”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

                      “The Security Council expresses its deep concern about the growing insecurity and the continued rise in violence in Burundi, as well as the persisting political impasse in the country, marked by a lack of dialogue among Burundian stakeholders.

 

                      “The Security Council takes note of the meeting of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union (AU) of 17 October 2015 on the situation in Burundi and the statement, including its proposed next steps, adopted on that occasion.

 

                      “The Security Council is deeply concerned by the increased cases of human rights violations and abuses, including those involving extra-judicial killings, acts of torture and other cruel, inhuman and/or degrading treatment, arbitrary arrests and illegal detentions. The Security Council expresses also its deep concerns on the prevalence of impunity, on the daily assassinations, on the restrictions on enjoyment of the freedom of expression, including for members of the press, and on the continued worsening of the humanitarian situation, marked by the more than 200,000 Burundian citizens seeking refuge in neighboring countries. The Security Council commends efforts by those in the region to respond to the humanitarian crisis and provide necessary resources to Burundian refugees.

 

                      “The Security Council strongly condemns all violations and abuses of human rights and acts of unlawful violence committed in Burundi both by security forces and by militias and other illegal armed groups, and expresses its determination to seek accountability for perpetrators of such acts. The Security Council welcomes the decision of the African Union to launch an in‑depth investigation on the violations and abuses of human rights against individuals in Burundi.

 

                      “The Security Council recalls the importance of respecting the Constitution of Burundi as well as the Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement of August 2000 and stresses that the situation prevailing in Burundi has the potential to seriously undermine the significant gains achieved through the Arusha Agreement, with devastating consequences for Burundi and the region as a whole.

 

                      “The Security Council urges all those involved to reject armed rebellion to resolve the current crisis and once again, urgently appeals to the Burundian stakeholders to engage in dialogue and to spare their country and its people further suffering. The Security Council reiterates its conviction that genuine and inclusive dialogue, based on respect for the Constitution and Arusha Agreement, would best enable the Burundian stakeholders to find a consensual solution to the crisis facing their country, preserve peace and consolidate democracy and the rule of law. The Security Council notes of the establishment of the National Commission for the inter-Burundian Dialogue.

 

                      “The Security Council reemphasizes the importance of the mediation efforts led by President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda on behalf of the East African Community (EAC) and as endorsed by the African Union, underlines the importance of the urgent resumption of the mediation process, and urges the Burundian Government and other concerned stakeholders to extend full cooperation to the Mediator. The Security Council stresses the importance of convening an inter-Burundian dialogue in coordination with the government of Burundi and all concerned and peaceful stakeholders, both who are in Burundi and those outside the country, in order to find a consensual and nationally owned solution to the current crisis.

 

                      “The Security Council welcomes the decision by the AU PSC to increase the number of AU human rights observers and military experts deployed by the African Union in Burundi and reiterates its call to the Burundian Government and others stakeholders to provide full cooperation to facilitate their effective and immediate deployment and implementation of their mandate. The Security Council notes the decision of the African Union to impose targeted sanctions, including travel ban and asset freeze, against all the Burundian stakeholders whose actions and statements contribute to the perpetuation of violence and impede the search for a solution, and expresses its intention to follow closely and respond to any actions that threaten the peace, security and stability of Burundi.”

 
   

Statement by the President of the Security Council

 

           At the 7537th meeting of the Security Council, held on 20 October 2015, in connection with the Council’s consideration of the item entitled “The situation in the Central African Republic”, the President of the Security Council made the following statement on behalf of the Council:

 

                     “The Security Council expresses its deep concern about the recent upsurge of violence and instability in the Central African Republic (CAR), which aimed at destabilising the country and jeopardising the transition process. The Security Council strongly condemns such violence, including all attacks against civilians, intercommunal violence, targeted violence against women and children, lootings of humanitarian premises and attacks against United Nations peacekeepers.

 

                     “The Security Council emphasises that some of these attacks may constitute war crimes and that those responsible for all abuses and violations of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law must be held accountable.

 

                     “The Security Council also emphasises that those undermining the peace, stability or security of the CAR, threatening or impeding the political transition process, targeting of civilians and attacking peacekeepers may meet criteria for designation under sanctions as stated in UNSCR 2196 (2015).

 

                     “The Security Council reiterates its strong condemnation of all violations of applicable international law and demands that all parties concerned strictly comply with their obligations under international humanitarian law and international human rights law, as applicable, as well as implement relevant decisions of the Security Council.

 

                     “The Security Council reiterates its support for the Transitional Authorities, under the leadership of Catherine Samba-Panza as the Transitional Head of State, and calls on all stakeholders in the CAR to commit to peace and reconciliation through the implementation of the agreements adopted at the Bangui Forum in May 2015.

 

                     “The Security Council reiterates its decision to apply the asset freeze and travel ban measures contained in paragraphs 4 and 7 of resolution 2196 (2015), to individuals and entities engaging in or providing support for acts that undermine the peace, stability or security of the CAR, consistent with paragraph 11 and 12 of resolution 2196 (2015). The Security Council also reiterates its intention to further expand the list of individuals and entities maintained by the Sanctions Committee established pursuant to resolution 2127 (2013) by adding those responsible for the recent outbreak of violence, particularly those who have provided support to, acted for or on behalf of, or at the direction of, an individual or an entity already sanctioned by the Committee.

 

                     “The Security Council reiterates that those responsible for the recent violence, both perpetrators and those who otherwise participate, should be held accountable and reiterates that some of those recent acts of violence may amount to crimes under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), to which CAR is State Party. The Security Council welcomes in this regard the statement of the Prosecutor of the ICC of 30 September 2015 regarding the recent upsurge of violence in the CAR, and in which the Prosecutor noted that a year ago, following a referral by the Central African Republic authorities, the Prosecutor opened an investigation into crimes committed in the country since 1 August 2012.

 

                     “The Security Council calls on the Transitional Authorities to launch, with the technical assistance of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the CAR (MINUSCA), investigations to identify those responsible and bring them to justice.

 

                     “The Security Council underlines the possible role that the domestic Special Criminal Court might play in this regard, and stresses the urgency in the Court taking up its initial functions, and emphasizes the need for MINUSCA to provide technical assistance and capacity building for the CAR Authorities in line with paragraph 32(g) of its mandate pursuant to resolution 2217 (2015).

 

                     “The Security Council expresses concern about the recurring incidents of prisoners escaping from custody in the CAR, which negatively impacts the fight against impunity and the efforts to stabilise the country, calls upon the Transitional Authorities to bolster their efforts to investigate and prosecute and to detain prisoners in a safe, secure and humane manner, with MINUSCA’s support as appropriate in accordance with its mandate. It also expresses its concerns about the reported participation of some elements of the Forces armées centrafricaines (FACA) in the recent incidents in Bangui, underlining the need for training, and the importance of progress in reforming the security sector, including on vetting and on accountability processes in the defense and security forces, to be accomplished before the FACA can be returned to operational duties.

 

                     “The Security Council demands that all those who seek to weaken the transitional government from within and outside the CAR, including militias and non-state armed groups, cease all forms of violence and destabilizing activities immediately, lay down their arms, and fully implement the agreement for Cessation of Hostilities and Violence signed on 23 July 2014 in Brazzaville, Congo as well as the agreement on principles of DDR and SSR adopted at the Bangui Forum of May 2015.

 

                     “The Security Council takes note of the significant progress achieved in the voters registration process in the CAR, with an unprecedented number of citizens registered to date; calls for this process to be completed swiftly, and emphasizes the importance of the registration of all CAR populations, including refugees in neighbouring States.

 

                     “The Security Council reiterates the critical importance and urgency of holding the constitutional referendum and first rounds of presidential and legislative elections by the end of 2015, in a free, fair, transparent manner, which is inclusive of all the components of the CAR society, and in accordance with the Transitional Constitutional Charter. In this regard, the Security Council underlines that the provisions of the Transitional Constitutional Charter should be strictly and fully implemented, and calls on the Transitional Authorities, including the National Elections Authority (ANE) and the National Transitional Council, to adopt and publish, without any further delay, a revised calendar for the holding of elections as soon as possible. The Security Council also calls upon the ANE to continue the preparations for the referendum and the elections, without delay.

 

                     “The Security Council underscores the importance of making all appropriate efforts to ensure peace and reconciliation in the Central African Republic, in this regard commends the joint action of religious leaders in the CAR in pursuing intercommunal peace, and calls upon the CAR authorities to take all necessary steps to create conditions for lasting reconciliation, including by protecting civilians from any religious or ethnic-based violence.

 

                     “The Security Council emphasises that the continued role of the region, including the International Mediator, the Chair of the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) and the countries of the sub-region, as well as the African Union, and the United Nations as participants in the mediation, is critical for the promotion of lasting peace and stability in the CAR. The Security Council encourages countries in the region to further use their leverage and regional meetings to encourage progress on the transition and towards the elections and to prevent spoilers, within the CAR and outside, from attempting to disrupt these processes.

 

                     “The Security Council calls upon troop and police contributing countries to MINUSCA to expedite the upgrading of their capabilities, and urges other member states to provide the necessary support to enable them to reach United Nations standards without any further delay.

 

                     “The Security Council further calls upon the international community to continue to support the CAR by addressing critical priorities articulated by Central Africans during the Bangui Forum for the next 12-18 months, which include disarmament, demobilization, reintegration and repatriation (DDRR), security sector reform, justice and reconciliation, including the establishment of the domestic Special Criminal Court, strengthening the capacity of local courts and the establishment of the Justice, Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the restoration and extension of State authority in support of democratic and economic governance, and economic and social development. The Security Council welcomes the high-level event held on the margins of the General Assembly, and encourages Member-States who have pledged support for these programmes to disburse funds quickly and to garner additional support in priority areas that remain underfunded.

 

                     “The Security Council reiterates its support for MINUSCA to assist, as mandated by the Security Council in resolution 2217 (2015) the Transitional Authorities and the people of the Central African Republic in their efforts to bring lasting peace and stability to their country, protect civilians, including those targeted on ethnic or religious grounds, and restore State authority over the entire territory.

 

                     “The Security Council expresses concern with reports that two sanctioned individuals are travelling in the region, and underlines its observation that individuals who knowingly facilitate the travel of a listed individual in violation of the travel ban may be determined by the Committee to have met the designation criteria for sanctions.”

 
   
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